CNIE – Digital Storytelling in the Humanities Classroom

Brian Lamb –Director, Innovation TRU

What is happening with digital storytelling in higher ed?

http://ds106.us/

Ken Simpson, Professor of English and Modern Languages

Herms--Pandora's Box (1992)--Crocker Museum

Herms--The Librarian (1960)--Norton Simon Museum

Herms--The Meat Market (1960)--de Young Museum

Nature of appropriation in art.

Motivation for the assignment, and process of planning it.

Brian – What goes into planning a digital storytelling assignment?

Technical support and training, planning and requirements.

Getting past FUD with copyright, and with privacy.

And cool tools – like X-Ray Goggles (part of free online Mozilla Webmaker suite)

Examples: NY Times Mashup, Memes

Student work: Juana Zeme (video); Abetopia (video)

Introducing “standalone model” for mashup media in the literature classroom.

Example: The Sun Rising (John Donne)

Digital Storytelling in the Humanities Classroom

Brian Lamb –Director, Innovation TRU

What is happening with digital storytelling in higher ed?

http://ds106.us/

Ken Simpson, Professor of English and Modern Languages

The Literature of Utopia course.

Nature of appropriation in art.

Motivation for the assignment, and process of planning it.

Brian – What goes into planning a digital storytelling assignment?

Technical support and training, planning and requirements.

Getting past FUD with copyright, and with privacy.

And cool tools – like X-Ray Goggles (part of free online Mozilla Webmaker suite)

Examples: NY Times Mashup, Memes

Abetopia

Andria Parker, TRU Student

Student perspective on assignment.

Her work: http://abetopia.wordpress.com/

Scaling up:

Considerations in digital storytelling assignments in other courses. Varying degrees of assignment expectations, and formal support provided.

Discussion:

So, what do the students get out of this?

Firebug

 

I used Firebug to create this little Craigslist posting the other day. I am still quite amazed with how it works as an art tool, and it is definitely a lot of fun to use.

My group’s presentation is going quite well, we have divvied up the workload so that now everyone is posting things on the page. It has made things a lot less stressful for me, as the web page was becoming wrought with content and I was not sure I could keep up with adding it in time.

I just thought I should share something before class today, but feel free to look at the page in its entirety here 

^_^

Screen Shot 2013-11-20 at 11

 

Introducing Audio to the Utopia Project

Hi everyone,

I got a cool idea from Ken that I thought I could share with you guys, maybe get your ideas firing. The whole project that we’re doing is sort of a conglomeration of visual mashups. Ken has specifically explained that he wants the final project to be very visual.

Well, my group had an idea to introduce a little bit of audio mashup into the project as well, so we’re doing a early 20th century style radio broadcast about one aspect of the utopian society.

One of my group members took this challenge with excitement and created a little demo of what it might sound like (the actual content of this clip is a monologue from the play Antigone).

Hope this gives you guys some ideas to broaden your project (as long as you don’t steal my groups idea!)
Cheers!

Andrew G. Cooper

Other virtual literary utopias

Last night I got a notification that TRU’s Dean of Students, Chris Adam, had mentioned me on Twitter.

The video for Carleton’s Hyperlab does indeed look super-cool, I could only dream of having something like that set-up at TRU. I did a little more poking around on Professor of English Brian Greenspan,  and read in his bio he is “particularly interested in how utopian and dystopian narratives from any given era represent and respond to contemporary narrative technologies, and in how the lessons of Utopian Studies might inform the new affordances offered by hypertext, video games and social media.”

This project sounds kind of wild:

Using our StoryTrek authorware, I am creating an “archival atlas” of New World utopias and dystopias. By mapping archival city narratives, photos, plans, blueprints and visionary descriptions onto actual geospatial sites, I use the city streets themselves as an open, interactive and dialectical interface to historical narratives of urban upheaval and renewal.

The archival atlas project combines literary and cultural critique with new collaborative tools for multimedia spatial analysis, tracing continuities between the earliest radical media and recent forms of networked activism. It aims to theorize the transition from textual archives to narrative databases, linking social and cultural geographies to recent debates over the future of libraries and the printed book.

I couldn’t help but let him know about our emerging Department of Utopian Communications:

Perhaps Dr. Greenspan would agree to be a virtual guest for one of our upcoming seminar chats later in the semester?

Firebuggy – Or get X-Ray Goggled?

So as we create artifacts to flesh out the depiction of our Utopias, we might take advantage of tools that allow us to rework existing media in the forms of parodies, mashups, etc… One of my favorites is Firebug, an extension of Firefox.

The tool is actually framed as a tool for web developers to debug web pages. But the DS106 community has cleverly appropriated it as a powerful web storytelling tool.

I have previously referred to Martha Burtis’s post on this approach, in preparation for what I hoped would be a live virtual hookup between her and the Department of Utopian Communications. Alas, cruel circumstance conspired to prevent this meeting of minds. There are a couple other resources that might salve our disappointment:

A live broadcast on web storytelling from Martha and her colleague Tim Owens. They cut into the nitty gritty of Firebug about half-way through.

Firebug Basics drawn from the DS106 Docs collection.

I see that this post from a year ago (“Chicken Soup for the ds106 Soul-Storytelling within the web!”) recommends the use of Mozilla’s Hackasaurus X-Ray Goggles instead of Firebug. I’ve never used it. Maybe one of us should try it?